Tag Archives: modulus

C++ || Snippet – How To Convert A Decimal Number Into Binary

This page will demonstrate how to convert a decimal number (i.e a whole number) into its binary equivalent. So for example, if the decimal number of 26 was entered into the program, it would display the converted binary value of 11010.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS SNIPPET

How To Count In Binary
The "Long" Datatype - What Is It?
While Loops
Online Binary to Decimal Converter - Verify For Correct Results
How To Reverse A String

If you are looking for sample code which converts binary to decimal, check back here soon!


The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output
Note: The code was compiled 3 separate times to display different output

====== RUN 1 ======

Please enter an integer value: 1987

The integer value of 1987 = 11111000011 in binary

====== RUN 2 ======

Please enter an integer value: -26

The integer value of -26 = -11010 in binary

====== RUN 3 ======

Please enter an integer value: 12345678910

The integer value of 12345678910 = 1011011111110111000001110000111110 in binary

Java || Modulus – Celsius To Fahrenheit Conversion Displaying Degrees Divisible By 10 Using Modulus

This page will consist of two simple programs which demonstrate the use of the modulus operator (%).

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS PROGRAM

Modulus
Do/While Loop
Methods (A.K.A "Functions") - What Are They?
Simple Math - Divisibility
Celsius to Fahrenheit Conversion

===== FINDING THE DIVISIBILITY OF A NUMBER =====

Take a simple arithmetic problem: what’s left over when you divide an odd number by an even number? The answer may not be easy to compute, but we know that it will most likely result in an answer which has a decimal remainder. How would we determine the divisibility of a number in a programming language like Java? That’s where the modulus operator comes in handy.

To have divisibility means that when you divide the first number by another number, the quotient (answer) is a whole number (i.e – no decimal values). Unlike the division operator, the modulus operator (‘%’), has the ability to give us the remainder of a given mathematical operation that results from performing integer division.

To illustrate this, here is a simple program which prompts the user to enter a number. Once the user enters a number, they are asked to enter in a divisor for the previous number. Using modulus, the program will determine if the second number is divisible by the first number. If the modulus result returns 0, the two numbers are divisible. If the modulus result does not return 0, the two numbers are not divisible. The program will keep re-prompting the user to enter in a correct choice until a correct result is obtained.


The above program determines if number ‘A’ is divisible be number ‘B’ via modulus. Unlike the division operator, which does not return the remainder of a number, the modulus operator does, thus we are able to find divisibility between two numbers.

To demonstrate the above code, here is a sample run:

Welcome to My Programming Notes' Java Program.

Please enter a value: 21
Please enter a factor of 21: 5

Incorrect, 21 is not divisible by 5.

Please enter a new multiple integer for 21: 7
Correct! 21 is divisible by 7

(21/7) = 3

===== CELSIUS TO FAHRENHEIT CONVERSION DISPLAYING DEGREES DIVISIBLE BY 10 =====

Now that we understand how modulus works, the second program shouldn’t be too difficult. This function first prompts the user to enter in an initial (low) value. After the program obtains the low value from the user, the program will ask for another (high) value. After it obtains the needed information, it displays all the degrees, from the range of the low number to the high number, which are divisible by 10. So if the user enters a low value of 3 and a high value of 303, the program will display all of the Celsius to Fahrenheit degrees within that range which are divisible by 10.


QUICK NOTES:
The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output

Welcome to My Programming Notes' Java Program.

Enter a low number: 3
Enter a high number: 303

Celsius Fahrenheit:
3..........37.4
10.........50
20.........68
30.........86
40........104
50........122
60........140
70........158
80........176
90........194
100.......212
110.......230
120.......248
130.......266
140.......284
150.......302
160.......320
170.......338
180.......356
190.......374
200.......392
210.......410
220.......428
230.......446
240.......464
250.......482
260.......500
270.......518
280.......536
290.......554
300.......572
303.......577.4

Java || Snippet – How To Convert A Decimal Number Into Binary

This page will demonstrate how to convert a decimal number (i.e a whole number) into its binary equivalent. So for example, if the decimal number of 25 was entered into the program, it would display the converted binary value of 11001.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS SNIPPET

How To Count In Binary
The "Long" Datatype - What Is It?
Methods (A.K.A "Functions") - What Are They?
While Loops
Online Binary to Decimal Converter - Verify For Correct Results

If you are looking for sample code which converts binary to decimal, check back here soon!


QUICK NOTES:
The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output
Note: The code was compiled 3 separate times to display different output

====== RUN 1 ======

Welcome to My Programming Notes' Java Program.

Please enter an integer value: 5

The integer value of 5 = 101 in binary

====== RUN 2 ======

Welcome to My Programming Notes' Java Program.

Please enter an integer value: -25

The integer value of -25 = -11001 in binary

====== RUN 3 ======

Welcome to My Programming Notes' Java Program.

Please enter an integer value: 12345678910

The integer value of 12345678910 = 1011011111110111000001110000111110 in binary

C++ || Convert Time From Seconds Into Hours, Min, Sec Format

Here is another simple programming assignment. This page will demonstrate how to convert time from -seconds- into HH::MM::SS (hours, minutes seconds) format. So for example, if you had an input time of 9630 seconds, the program would display the converted time of 2 hours, 40 minutes, and 30 seconds.

Using simple math, this program utilizes the modulus operator, and the division operator during the conversion process.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS PROGRAM

Modulus - What is it?
How Many Seconds Are In One Hour?
How Many Seconds Are In One Minute?


QUICK NOTES:
The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output
(Note: the code was compile five separate times to display different output)

====== RUN 1 ======

Enter a time in seconds: 9630

The time in HH:MM:SS format is: 2 hours, 40 minutes, and 30 seconds!

====== RUN 2 ======

Enter a time in seconds: 7200

The time in HH:MM:SS format is: 2 hours, 0 minutes, and 0 seconds!

====== RUN 3 ======

Enter a time in seconds: 45

The time in HH:MM:SS format is: 0 hours, 0 minutes, and 45 seconds!

====== RUN 4 ======

Enter a time in seconds: 134

The time in HH:MM:SS format is: 0 hours, 2 minutes, and 14 seconds!

====== RUN 5 ======

Enter a time in seconds: 31536000

The time in HH:MM:SS format is: 8760 hours, 0 minutes, and 0 seconds!

C++ || Snippet – Round A Number To The Nearest Whole Number

This page will display a simple implementation of a function which rounds a floating point number to the nearest whole number. So for example, if the number 12.34542 was sent to the function, it would return the rounded value of 12.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS SNIPPET

Modf - Modulus For Float Data
How To Round A Number


QUICK NOTES:
The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output
(Note: the code was compile three separate times to display different output)

====== RUN 1 ======

Enter in a floating point number to round: 1.3333

1.3333 rounded to the nearest whole number is: 1

====== RUN 2 ======

Enter in a floating point number to round: 35.56

35.56 rounded to the nearest whole number is: 36

====== RUN 3 ======

Enter in a floating point number to round: 19.8728

19.8728 rounded to the nearest whole number is: 20

C++ || Snippet – How To Reverse An Integer Using Modulus & While Loop

This page will consist of a simple program which demonstrates how to reverse an integer (not an int array) using modulus and a while loop.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS SNIPPET

Functions
Modulus
While Loops


QUICK NOTES:
The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output
(Note: the code was compiled three separate times to display different output)

==== RUN #1 ====

Enter a number: 2012
2012 reversed is: 2102

==== RUN #2 ====

Enter a number: 1987
1987 reversed is: 7891

==== RUN #3 ====

Enter a number: 241
241 reversed is: 142

C++ || Cash Register Simulation – Display The Total Sales Amount In Dollars & Cents Using Modulus

The following is a simple program which demonstrates more use of the modulus (%) function to manipulate integer data.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS PROGRAM

Modulus
Type Casting - Int
The Value Of U.S Currency

This program first prompts the user to enter in a monetary amount into the system. This number can be a decimal number, or a whole number. Once the user enters in an amount, the program will use the modulus operator to determine exactly how many 1 dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickles, and pennies consisted of the amount that the user entered into the program. So for example, if the user entered the value of 2.34, the program would display the result of 2 dollars, 1 quarters, 0 dimes, 1 nickels, and 4 pennies.


QUICK NOTES:
The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output
(Note: the code was compile three separate times to display different output)

====== RUN 1 ======

Enter the total sales amount in dollars & cents (for example 19.87): 19.87

The amount of $19.87 consists of:
19 dollar(s)
3 quarter(s)
1 dime(s)
0 nickel(s)
2 pennie(s)

====== RUN 2 ======

Enter the total sales amount in dollars & cents (for example 19.87): 11.93

The amount of $11.93 consists of:
11 dollar(s)
3 quarter(s)
1 dime(s)
1 nickel(s)
3 pennie(s)

====== RUN 3 ======

Enter the total sales amount in dollars & cents (for example 19.87): 3.00

The amount of $3 consists of:
3 dollar(s)
0 quarter(s)
0 dime(s)
0 nickel(s)
0 pennie(s)

C++ || Modulus – Celsius To Fahrenheit Conversion Displaying Degrees Divisible By 10 Using Modulus

This page will consist of two simple programs which demonstrate the use of the modulus operator (%).

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS PROGRAM

Modulus
Do/While Loop
Functions
Simple Math - Divisibility
Celsius to Fahrenheit Conversion

===== FINDING THE DIVISIBILITY OF A NUMBER =====

Take a simple arithmetic problem: what’s left over when you divide an odd number by an even number? The answer may not be easy to compute, but we know that it will most likely result in an answer which has a decimal remainder. How would we determine the divisibility of a number in a programming language like C++? That’s where the modulus operator comes in handy.

To have divisibility means that when you divide the first number by another number, the quotient (answer) is a whole number (i.e – no decimal values). Unlike the division operator, the modulus operator (‘%’), has the ability to give us the remainder of a given mathematical operation that results from performing integer division.

To illustrate this, here is a simple program which prompts the user to enter a number. Once the user enters a number, they are asked to enter in a divisor for the previous number. Using modulus, the program will determine if the second number is divisible by the first number. If the modulus result returns 0, the two numbers are divisible. If the modulus result does not return 0, the two numbers are not divisible. The program will keep re-prompting the user to enter in a correct choice until a correct result is obtained.

The above program determines if number ‘A’ is divisible be number ‘B’ via modulus. Unlike the division operator, which does not return the remainder of a number, the modulus operator does, thus we are able to find divisibility between two numbers.

To demonstrate the above code, here is a sample run:

Please enter a value: 21
Please enter a factor of 21: 5

Incorrect, 21 is not divisible by 5.
Please enter a new multiple integer for that value: 7

Correct! 21 is divisible by 7
(21/7) = 3

===== CELSIUS TO FAHRENHEIT CONVERSION =====

Now that we understand how modulus works, the second program shouldn’t be too difficult. This function first prompts the user to enter in an initial (low) value. After the program obtains the low value from the user, the program will ask for another (high) value. After it obtains the needed information, it displays all the degrees, from the range of the low number to the high number, which are divisible by 10. So if the user enters a low value of 3 and a high value of 303, the program will display all of the Celsius to Fahrenheit degrees within that range which are divisible by 10.


QUICK NOTES:
The highlighted lines are sections of interest to look out for.

The code is heavily commented, so no further insight is necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

Once compiled, you should get this as your output

Enter a low number: 3
Enter a high number: 303

Celsius Fahrenheit:
3..........37.4
10.........50
20.........68
30.........86
40........104
50........122
60........140
70........158
80........176
90........194
100.......212
110.......230
120.......248
130.......266
140.......284
150.......302
160.......320
170.......338
180.......356
190.......374
200.......392
210.......410
220.......428
230.......446
240.......464
250.......482
260.......500
270.......518
280.......536
290.......554
300.......572
303.......577.4